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Full text of "A letter from the Right Rev. Alfred Willis, Bishop of Honolulu, to all friends of the Hawaiian Mission : and a balance sheet of accounts for the years 1874, 1875, and part of 1876"

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L I B R.ARY 

OF THE 

U N IVER5ITY 

Of ILLI NOIS 



A LETTER 

FROM 

THE RIGHT REV. ALFRED WILLIS, 
^i$i)op of Honoltilu, 

TO ALL FRIENDS 

op 

THE HAWAIIAN MISSION, 



A BALANCE SHEET OF ACCOUNTS FOE THE YEAES 

1874, 1875, AND PART OF 1876. 



I 



LONDON : 
PRINTED BY W. KNOTT, 26, BROOKE STREET, HOLBORN, E.G. 

1877. 



A LETTER, 

(inc. 



My Dear Friends, 

I have allowed a longer time to elapse without sending 
you a second report of the Mission than I ever intended. But the 
truth is, the months have flown by, and left so little to record, 
beyond that of an uneventful round of work, and changes have 
followed one another so rapidly, that there would have been very 
little satisfaction in expressing an opinion on passing events, or 
even attempting to put them on record, when a change of circum- 
stances might have entirely altered the aspect of affairs before my 
letter was in type. 

Before the close of last year, I had, however, resolved on 
sending you a report of the last two years, with a balance-sheet of 
the receipts and expenditure of the fund with which your generosity 
has supplied me, and had already commenced my letter, when the 
sad intelligence reached the Islands of the decease of Miss Sellon, 
to whom this Mission is so deeply indebted. The position in 
which the Mission is left by her departure is a very serious one, 
and I can only trust that, when the circumstances are fully known, 
new friends may come forward to sustain a Mission for which she 
did so much. Her munificence saved the Mission from collapse 
after the resignation of the See by my predecessor. Bishop Staley, 
before I was consecrated to it. At that time she made herself 
responsible for the sum of £400 per annum to the Mission funds 
for five years, and this noble contribution has been the mainstay of 
the Special Fund, on which I have chiefly depended for fulfilling 
my obligations to the Clergy, and for defraying the general expenses 
of the Mission. 

Bat this is not the only loss the Mission sustains. You are 
aware that there are on these Islands two most excellent institutions, 
both founded by Miss Sellon, and carried on by the Devonport 
Sisters — St. Andrew's Priory at Honolulu, and the School of 
St. Cross, Lahaina. If I could give you a description of the social 
condition of these Islands — the style of domestic life stiU followed 
by the majority of the natives, unchanged by their nominal 
Christianity, which provides not a single safeguard for feniale 
chastity; the deadness of the moral sense of the ordinary Hawaiian, 
his utter indifference to his daughter's prostitution — you would 
understand of what incalculable value these Schools are to the 
Hawaiian race. There are, I am thankful to say, Hawaiians who 
have risen out of this degradation, whose lives are pure, and who 
long for a better state of things, and bless the memory of Miss 
Sellon. They see that- the only hope of staying the present decrease 



of the population is by preserving the chastity of their daughters 
from violation ; and this can only be done by Boarding Schools, 
such as those which Miss Sellon has founded. The father of one 
of the pupils of St. Cross, of unblemished character, who has done 
credit to her training, and is now an assistant in the School, has 
told me frequently, that he wished his daughter to remain in the 
School until she shoidd be married. 

These few words, to which it is unnecessary to add more, will, 
I think, be sufficient to show you that no greater calamity could 
befal the Mission than the closing of one of these Schools. In con- 
sequence of Miss Sellon's decease, St. Cross can no longer be carried 
on by the Sisters. Sister Bertha, who has hitherto had charge of 
St. Andrew's Priory, has to return to England immediately, as 
Miss Sellon's successor ; and Eldress Phoebe has to come to Hono- 
lulu with Sister Mary Clara, to take the superintendence of 
St. Andrew's Priory. On January 8th, the day on which the sad 
tidings of Miss Sellon's death arrived, I learned to my sorrow that 
St. Cross must be given up, and the property sold. Happily, I 
had already appointed the Eev. S. H. Davis, who has hitherto been 
at Kona on Hawaii, to take charge of the Mission at Lahaina, 
which has been without a Pastor since the death, on St. Bartho- 
lomew's Day, of the Eev. C. Searle, whom I appointed in the 
previous April. It immediately occurred to me that Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis would carry on the institution. I have therefore become 
the purchaser, and have made arrangements so that the School 
will pass into their hands, without any break, or even temporary 
dismissal of the scholars. 

This is eminently satisfactory, and I cannot but recognize the 
guidance of the Divine Head of the Church, in so overruling events 
as to make it possible for the institution to be saved. But at the 
same time I must put before you that this transaction is one which 
exhausts my already impoverished treasury, and this is a most serious 
and anxious matter in view of the greatly diminished income that 
will flow into it, unless the amount of contributions is very much 
enlarged. I have, however, full confidence that when the position 
of the Mission is realised, a new sympathy will be awakened, and 
funds will be forthcoming to relieve me from my present anxiety. 
But this hope may prove illusory. Let me, therefore, earnestly beg 
of all who are subscribers not to wait till the end of the year before 
paying their subscriptions, but bear in mind that at the end of 
each quarter I have obligations to meet for which I depend on the 
Special Pund. 

My hope is that an endowment for the See may soon be raised. 
I am about to issue an appeal in this behalf, which I trust will 
meet with a liberal response. The endowment fund, however, 
must not be allowed to interfere with subscriptions to the Special 
Pund for the current expenses of the Mission. ^„ 



u,uc 



My belief remains unshaken, in spite of the croaking of 
adversaries and lukewarm friends, that there is a future in store 
for the Church in these Islands, although at present we see but 
little fruit of our labours. Even now, in this day of sorrow and 
gloom, the edges of the dark cloud are bright with promise of the 
future. 

But before that future can be realized, and the Church gathers 
the population of these Islands into her bosom, two things are 
needful. First, the Church must be put on a wider and broader 
basis than it is at present ; and secondly, we must have a body of 
Clergy, who by long residence in the Islands, and familiarity with 
the language and characteristics of the people, can have that 
sympathy with them which is necessary before any real influence 
with them can be hoped for. 

But neither of these can be attained without increased funds. 
To take the second point first, change, change, change, has been the 
lot of this Mission from its outset, and still continues, as a com- 
parison of the names of my fellow-workers published in my last 
printed letter with those of my present staff will too plainly testify. 
One cause of these changes has been the great amount of uncertainty 
attaching to stipends, which are necessarily made dependent partly 
on local subscriptions. I do not think that this cause would have 
operated by itself, were it not for our neighbourhood to the Colonies, 
and the inducement which they oifer to men to labour among their 
own countrymen and under their own flag. There is, doubtless, an 
isolation in these Islands, and a want of sympathy with their work 
on the part of a large number of the residents, which to many minds 
is a very great trial ; and, though there are no physical privations 
to be endured, as in a northern clim^ate, makes it none the less 
necessary for any who would do real work here in the Master's 
service to be ready to endure hardness. 

What I mean will become more clear to you, when I come to 
discuss the second point I mentioned — the necessity of placing the 
Mission on a broader basis. In my last letter I gave you a sketch 
of the points that we occupy in the Islands, together with a map, 
from which you would judge how small, comparatively, is the area 
in which the Church is as yet represented. Since then there has 
been but little alteration. The buildings I was then contemplating 
at Waialua, on Oahu, have been erected, and the School at Kapalana 
on the outskirts of Honolulu opened. I have not yet been able to 
commence a Mission at Waiohinu, on the Island of Hawaii, where 
our presence is much desired. But I can report a movement in 
Kohala in the north of the Island, to obtain the ministrations of 
the Church. An American Clergyman is now in correspondence 
with me, who wiU, I hope, be eventually appointed to one of these 
districts. 



Now, if you will look at the map, and consider that the 
Congregational system has been so thoroughly organised through 
the Islands, that every little village has its church and native 
minister, supported by the people, it will be clear to you what a 
delicate mission is entrusted to the Church. For whilst on the 
one hand we long to impart to them the fulness of the Gospel, 
which they have only imperfectly received, great care has to be 
taken lest we weaken the hold of the people upon such truth as 
they already have. It is weak enough already, and the influence 
of the foreigners amongst them is in the direction of a general 
indifference to religion. It is not the present generation that will 
be brought into the Church. But if we could plant Schools 
throughout the Islands, the rising generation might be trained in 
purer morals, and a truer knowledge of the way of life. 

If there are any who still entertain the idea, which I trust is 
exploded, that the Church should not enter into fields already 
occupied by other forms of Christianity, all I can say is. Come and 
see for yourself what these other forms are, and what is their result, 
and you wiU no longer wish to qualify the command of our 
Saviour to His Apostles, to go into all the word. As an organi- 
zation, Congregationalism here is admirable, but it has no elements 
of self-perpetuation, and as a system it is rotten to the core. It is 
no longer under the control of the American Missionaries who 
planted it. Its ministers are men of no training, and, with few 
exceptions, of no character. Tlie discourses delivered from their 
pulpits are mostly on political topics. Their communions are 
marked by a shocking irreverence, and in some places molasses and 
water are still substituted for wine. 

As a moral agent it is powerless to improve the people. The 
Puritan strictness which originally inveighed against the use of 
tobacco and spirits, as a sin equally reprehensible with adultery, has 
had no other result than to cause the native to commit adultery 
with as easy a conscience as he smokes his pipe and drinks his gin 
when he can get it. The attempt of the Puritan missionaries to 
enforce these tabus of tobacco and rum upon the natives as 
ordinances of the Gospel, while they could not restrain their own 
children, encouraged the people in hypocrisy, and the real blight 
on the life of the nation went on unchecked. To this day the 
ancient unnatural custom which allows a woman to have two 
husbands, a custom which lies at the root of the rapid decline of 
the race, is connived at. Men who are known to be guilty of it 
are held in honour, and are among the deacons of the native 
churches. 

Whilst Congregationalism is thus powerless to regenerate the 
nation, and seems almost to have abandoned the effort, the belief 
in the gods their fathers worshipped, which was never wholly 
given up, is re-asserting itself, and the kahunas, in whom the 
office, an hereditary one, of priest and doctor is combined, are 



exercising an increasing influence over the native mind. Where 
they are not believed in, they are feared. The belief that they 
have the power of j^raying to death lies at the root of this fear, and 
if, as I have very little doubt, they have, at least in former times, 
accomplished the death of their victims by secret poisoning or 
other means, it can be no matter of surprise that this fear should 
be deeply rooted. There is no doubt that in old times the kahunas 
had considerable skill both in medicine and surgery, and it is much 
to be regretted that their uses of the herbs of the country was not 
carefully investigated and treasured up. The knowledge that they 
possessed is now nearly all lost ; or if the properties of a plant 
continue to be known, the present kahunas are either ignorant of 
the mode of preparation, or of the proportions in which it should be 
administered. In such hands the practice of medicine is often 
attended with fatal results. Nevertheless, the natives have more 
faith in their own kahunas than in the foreign practitioner. The 
kahunas, for the sake of their own credit, make a very convenient 
division of diseases into native and foreign. They allow that the 
foreign disease requires the foreign doctor. When a patient dies, 
the friends are consoled by the comforting assurance that he had 
two diseases, and, though cured of the native complaint, he had 
succumbed to the foreign! Mixed up with a bona-fide practice of 
such knowledge as they have on the part of some, there is a great 
deal of humbug and trading on superstition on the part of others. 
A mother consulted a kahuna — a veritable witch, the kahunas 
being of both sexes — about her sick baby, and was told to cut off a 
lock of her hair, and give it the ashes. The infant was choked. 
A member of our illustrious legislature, in many ways an intelligent 
man, who was suffering from a disordered liver, sent for a kahuna. 
He was told that his life was in imminent danger, and that he 
could never get well in his own house, because one of the uprights 
of his grass house ivas crooked. The sick man left immediately. 
Just as in England and America it is not the ignorant, but those 
who are at once intelligent and irreligious, who become the votaries 
of Spiritualism, and dupes of impostors; so here it is not only 
among those who have made the least advance from their original 
condition, and have no acquaintance with English, but quite as 
much among those who have had a fair education, and can speak 
our language, that superstition is rife. There is in human nature a 
principle of faith, which must have something to rest upon ; and 
if it be not guided by the truth, it must rest upon lies. The 
quickening of the intellect, and the acquisition of knowledge 
cannot save the soul from becoming the victim of "strong delusions, 
that it should believe a lie ;" and when we see Englishmen and 
Americans who have left the Faith sinking down to the spiritual 
level of the tribes of Central Africa, who, having no belief in a 
Supreme Being, are firm believers in sorcery and magic, the return 
of the Hawaiian to his superstition ought to be no matter of 



8 



surprise. It is the result of a one-sided education, whicli pays no 
regard to the training of the immortal spirit. Here is the work 
which the Church has to do; to set the feet of the rising generation 
upon the Eock of the true Faith, instead of the shifting sands. 
But to do this we need a wider organization than we have at 
present. 



"C>^ 



But notwithstanding the smallness of our numbers, and the 
many difficulties we have to contend with, our work is silently 
progressing. The Confirmations in 1875 and 1876 show an increase 
over those in 1873-1874 ; the numbers having been as follows : 
1873, 1 4 ; 1874, 24 ; 1875, 28 -, 1876, 17. In these last two years, 
I have held 10 confirmations, 3 in Honolulu, 3 in Lahaina, 2 at 
Wailuku, 1 in South Koiia, and 1 at Waiohinu. The numbers 
confirmed in each place have been as follows : Honolulu, 30 ; 
Lahaina, 9 ; Wailuku, 4 ; South Kona, 1 ; Waiohinu, 1. 

The Confirmation at Waiohinu was of special interest, as being 
the first occasion that Confirmation had been administered, and the 
Holy Communion celebrated according to the Service of the Church 
of England, in that district. It is a somewhat tedious ride of 60 
miles from South Kona to the viUage of Waiohinu, over a 
succession of lava flows of varying date that have poured out of 
the sides of Mauna Loa, for the first part of the way so ancient, 
that a fine forest of ohias, with a tangled undergrowth of ferns and 
creeping plants, has grown up upon it ; for the second part so 
comparatively recent, that it is either a waste howling wilderness 
without a vestige of vegetation, or else covered with but a scanty 
scrub. For the first part of the journey the traveller will often be 
kept cool by a copious shower-bath from the tall ferns that overhang 
the narrow path ; in the latter part there is not a particle of shade, 
and if there is no wind stirring, the heated air quivers over the 
black clinkers as over a brick-kiln, and makes the road sufficiently 
trying both to man and beast. I have visited Waiohinu several 
times, and generally have made the journey there in a day and a 
half from South Kona, passing the night in a native house, and 
return in one day, leaving Waiohinu at 5 a.m. and arriving at the 
parsonage at Kona about 8 or 9 p.m. This allows the animals about 
three hours rest out of fifteen, at spots where feed can be obtained. 
The first Confirmation at Waiohinu took place last Ascension Day. 
We have Mission premises here : a good house standing on a three- 
acre lot enclosed by a stone wall, but unfortunately no Missionary 
at present. In this house I hold service on my visits. Hitherto I 
had been content with the bare room. It was necessary at least 
to have a decent arrangement for the Confirmation and Celebration 
which was to follow. 

I had nothing with me but the Eucharistic vessels. Travelling 
on horseback makes it impossibly to carry more than is absolutely 
necessary. The village lumber-yard furnished me with a plank of 



redwood cedar already planed on one side; this had only to be 
sawn in half, and I had the top of an altar six feet by two. To 
this it was easy to affix supports. The store supplied me with 
both red and green merino for altar frontal and dossal, and a good 
piece of linen for the white altar cloth ; so that there was an altar 
properly furnished for the solemnity. A few ferns and flowers hid 
the roughness of the cross, which stood on the altar ledge between 
a pair of kow candlesticks, which were lent. The room was 
decorated with fern wreaths and flowers, and over the altar a text 
drawn by my boy Polo ; but red ink is a very poor substitute for 
colours, which could not be obtained. The Confirmation, as I have 
said, took place on Ascension Day, in the presence of a small con- 
gregation. The next morning the newly- confirmed made her first 
Communion. I was accompanied by one of my scholars, Polo 
Kahaulelio, who is generally my companion on my journeys, and 
who is a communicant, and so there were two to commVinicate with 
the Celebrant. 

At Wailuku, the centre of the sugar-growing part of Maui, 
where there is a large number of foreign residents, the ministrations 
of Mr. Bridger are much appreciated, and his little Church is well 
attended. The Mission is more nearly self-supporting here than in 
any other part of the Islands. Once a fortnight Mr. Bridger holds 
a service at Ulupalakua, which necessitates between the morning 
and evening services a hot dusty ride of 20 miles, with the ascent or 
descent of 2000 feetj Ulupalakua being on a spur of the great 
mountain of Haleekala. 

At Lahaina the Mission has had a large share of sorrow. After 
the departure of Mr. Blundun for British Columbia, in the autumn 
of 1875, Lahaina was dependent on such ministrations as I could 
personally give, until Easter 1876. I then appointed the Eev. C. 
Searle, a Clergyman who had been living in these Islands for some 
years, but in separation from the Church. I found him anxious to 
return, but he was a long time before he could consent to the 
necessary ordeal. On the first Sunday of the new year he made a 
public renunciation of his error in the Cathedral, and was restored 
to our Communion. He was then keeping a school at Waimea, 
on Hawaii. This was now attached to the Mission. But the 
school not being successful, and the need of a Priest at Lahaina 
being very urgent, i committed the work there to him, and he 
entered on his duties in April, bringing with him his remaining 
Waimea scholars. He was a good preacher, and was beginning to 
make an impression on the young men especially. He had, however, 
but a short time in which to labour for the Church to which he 
had been restored. After a short but painful illness, he was taken 
from us on St. Bartholomew's Daj^, and was laid in the Cemeteiy 
by Mr. Bridger on the following day. It was a matter of thank- 



10 

fulness that he had been given time to testify his repentance for 
his schism before he received his summons, and that he died 
where he could be buried in consecrated ground. 

Two months after this, on October 29th, Mr. Henry Dickenson, 
the local magistrate, and an earnest member of the Church in 
Lahaina, was laid by his side. He was advanced in years, but I 
had left him a fortnight before in good health, to proceed to Hawaii, 
and on my return heard that he had sustained an injury from 
which he never rallied. Hearing of his illness, but not supposing 
the end was so near, Mr. Bridger had arranged to go over from 
"Wailuku, and Mr. Dickenson was looking forward to the Cele- 
bration of the Holy Communion, which would take place in his 
room. Mr. Bridger's visit was fixed for Sunday. On Saturday 
evening a great change had taken place, and it was doubtful 
whether he would last till the morning. Mr. Campbell, the owner 
of the Lahaina plantation, at once despatched a messenger to 
Wailuku. Although only 20 miles distant, for five miles the road 
winds tediously over a mountain, and it requires a good horse to 
accomplish the journey in less than three and a half hours. On 
the present occasion the messenger was well mounted. But natives 
have an uncommonly small share of common-sense. This man 
rode so hard over the level ground for the first ten miles, that his 
horse was done up when he reached tlie mountain. It was 2 a.m. 
when he reached Wailuku. Mr. Bridger started with all the 
expedition possible, and shortly before 9 a.m. reached the house 
where Mr. Dickenson was dying. As he came through Lahaina, 
the report was current that the spirit had fled : but he was just in 
time Eldress Phoebe, who had been watching all night, had 
already said the Commendatory Prayer, when she saw Mr. Bridger 
approaching. She ran down, and begged him to hasten up. 

"The poor sufferer knew Mr. Bridger, and with his feeble 
hands clasped in Mr. Bridger's, he joined in the Lord's Prayer. 
There was only time for the Prayer ol Consecration He was 
sinldng ra^^idly, and just after he had received the Blessed 
Sacrament, his sjjiiit departed as quietly and gently as a little child 
falls to sleep. It was very beautiful to witness such a happy 
death." 

The above is from a letter I received from Eldress Phoebe. 
And now Lahaina mourns the loss of this good Sister, who has 
been a true Sister of Mercy both to foreigners and natives in time 
of sickness for many years. Her removal to Honolulu with Sister 
Mary Clara has already been mentioned. 

On the death of Mr. Searle, the boys he had brought -with 
him from Waimea were removed to my own School in Honolidu, 
and the number of my boarders was raised to 34. The School is 
in a very satisfactory condition, and I owe a special debt of 
gratitude to those kind friends, who by contributing to the support 
of a scholar have enabled me to give a Christian education to lads 



11 

whom I could not otherwise have received. At Christmas I held a 
thorough examination of the School, receiving from the upper 
classes very creditable papers. The prizes were given on December 
21st. The following account, that appeared in the Pacific Com- 
mercial Advertiser, written by a stranger to the School, will satisfy 
friends at home that our work is not wholly thrown away : — 

lOLANI COLLEGE. 

"On Thursday evening the distribution of prizes to the scholars 
of the Bishop's School commenced at seven p.m. The school-room 
had been put in quite a festive array by Chinese lanterns outside, 
and long wreaths of evergreens hung in festoons along the walls 
and ceiling ; and two flags, bearing the inscriptions, " Merry Christ- 
mas," and "Aloha oukou," gave evidence of the cosmopolitan 
character of the school. The audience was composed of many 
ladies and gentlemen, parents and friends of the boys, and a good 
number of natives, men and women, who had children at the school, 
and took a great interest in the proceedings, especially when the 
applause came in. 

" At the appointed time a large number of boys, perhaps 30 to 
40, marched into the hall, and took their places near a platform 
erected at the end of the room on which Bishop Willis and Mr. Clark, 
the teacher, took their seats, near a table loaded with books all 
splendidly bound in gorgeous red or blue, and prizes were distributed 
for good conduct, progress, etc, etc., while the good Bishop accom- 
panied every gift with such a kindly look and a few words of praise, 
that we doubt not that this to many proved about the best and 
most valued prize of all. After the distribution the platform was 
cleared, and the exercises of the evening commenced with singing ; 
recitations and singing alternating. Specimens of drawing by the 
boys were handed around, and we must confess that some of those 
gave much promise of higher attainments. Some maps were 
especially well executed. The recitations were as a whole very well 
spoken, and where all did well it is difficult to discriminate. Several 
very lengthy pieces gave proof of a good cultivation of memory ; 
and we observed with pleasure that some native boys had made 
good advances in pronouncing the Queen's English. The palm of the 
evening's rhetorical exercises it appears was generally awarded to a 
little shaver who had to be placed upon a chair on the platform, 
Johnny Low. His gesticulations were free, easy, and quite natural, 
his elocution perfect, and the applause elicted was tremendous. The 
singing was thoroughly good in time, and the blending of the voices 
harmonious, and the boys themselves (all of them on the platform, 
upon which they jumped with surprising agility) enjoyed the per- 
formance hugely. The performance very appropriately closed with 
a native song, "Hawaii Ponoi," and the audience rose highly 
pleased with the evening's entertainment, and we only regret that 
many who were not there have lost some pleasant hours. 



12 



" Although this is our first acquaintance with lolani College, 
we have no hesitation in coming to the conclusion, judging from 
effect to cause, that it must be a most excellent institution, and of 
a superior character. Such a number of intelligent and open faces 
can perhaps but very seldom be found in one school. The face is 
the reflex of the mind, prominently so in youth, l^o cramming 
and no stuffing by force can ever reflect upon the face that intelli- 
gence which only comes when the mind fully grasps the subject, 
and as it were incorporates it with itself. 

" "We must sincerely congratulate the teachers on the success of 
their laborious life (teaching is hard work indeed), and the Bishop 
on the establishment of a school which in its cosmopolitan character 
must prove a great blessing to this country by sending forth the 
right kind of men to take our places. When we express our thanks 
for the pleasant evening's entertainment, and our hearty wishes for 
the recurrence of many more such distributions of prizes at lolani 
College by the hands of BishojD Willis and his assistants, we only 
utter the sentiments of all who were present on the evening of 
December 21st, 1876." 

The following is the Programme of the Eecitations, in which I 
have given the nationalities of the boys — 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL. 

Recitations — Christmas, 1876. 



Piece. 


Boy. 


Age. 


Kace. 


Gelert's Grave 


George Markham 


16 


Anglo- Hawaiian 


Flight of Xerxes 


George Smithies 


13 


»> >> 


Discovery of America, 


James Kaneholo 


14 


Americo-Hawaiian 


Montgomery 








The Young Orator 


Matthew Mannia 


11 


»> >> 


Village Blacksmith, 


E. Blaisdell 


10 


American 


Longfellow 








Defence of the Bridge, 


J. C. Searle 


16 


Australian 


MacoAilay 








The Brook, Tennyson 


John Holt 


16 


Anglo-Hawaiian 


The Sea, Procter 


George Greig 


13 


Anglo- Tahitian 


Gold, Hood 


Eben Low 


12 


Americo- Hawaiian 


Death of Montrose, 


Pol(, Kahaulelio 


16 


Hawaiian 


A ytoun 








A Bit of a Boy 


John Low 


8 


Americo- Hawaiian 


Hubert and Arthur, 


Polo K., k G. Smithies 






K. John 








The First Grief, 


Haleakala Kanohi 


10 


Hawaiian 


Mrs. Hemans 









13 

After the copy of my last letter had been forwarded, I found 
there were some errors in the Subscription List for 1874. I there- 
fore append to this letter the list of contributions received in 1874, 
1875, and nine months of 1876, with balance sheets up to that 
date. I trust these will be found correct. If there are any errors, 
I shall be much obliged to any who will point them out to 
Francis Lowe, Esq., 2, Taniield Court, Temple, London, who 
succeeds the Eev. Walter Scott as my Commissary in England. 

Trusting that all who have so far supported this Mission will 
continue a liberal support, and not forget the Isles of the Sea in 
their supplications before the Throne of Grace, 

I remain. 

Faithfully yours in our Blessed Lord, 

ALFEED HONOLULU. 



MonolulUj Hawaiian Islands, 
January 29, 1877. 



u 



^iottm Df Honolulu. 

EIGHT REV. ALFRED WILLIS. D.D., BISHOP. 



Island. 


Station. 


Clekgy. 


Lay Tsachers. 


Oahu 


Honolulu 


The Bishop, Bean. 






St. Andrcio's 


Eev. T. Blackburn, M.A., 






Cathedral 


Senior Priest 
Rev. A. Mackintosh, 
Pi^ecentor 






Waialua 




Mr. E. Hoare 


Maui 


Lahaina, Church 
of Holy Inno- 
cents 


Rev. S. H. Davis 






Wailuku, Church 


Rev. John Bridger 


Mr. W. Swan 




of the Good 








Shepherd 








Haiku 






Hawaii 


South Kona, 

Christ Church 
Waiohinu 
Kohala 




Mr. A. Sala 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 



Bishop's College School. — A Boarding School. 



Principal, the Bishop. 
Assistants, 



St. Alban's College. — Principal, Alatan T. Atkinson, Esq 
Messrs. J. G. Trembeth and W. Green. 

St. Andkew's Priory. — A Boarding School for Girls, conducted by the 
Devonport Sisters of Mercy. 

St. Cross, Lahaina. — A Boarding School for Girls, conducted by the Rev. 
S. H. and Mrs. Davis. Assistant, Miss Mary K. Kahaulelio. 



I 



15 



Subscription List for the Year 1874. 





£ s. 


d. 




. £ s. 


d. 


Rer. M. Amphlett 


1 





Miss Eliza Willis . 


. 5 





Rev. S. Arnott . 


1 1 





Miss Emily Willis 


. 5 





Ven. Archdeacon Bicker 






Miss L. Willis . 


. 5 





steth .... 


5 





Rev. W. L. Wigan 


. 10 





Mrs. Bennett 


2 


6 


Rev. A. Wilson . 


. 1 1 





Rev. D. J. Boutflower . 


1 1 





Miss M. Wilson . 


. 10 


6 


Miss A. S. Bourne 


5 





The Misses Woodward 


. 1 





Rev. G. S. Cuthbert . 


10 


6 


Mrs. Yonge . 


. 2 





A. G. Dowell, Esq. 


1 











Rev. E. Elwes, 1873 . 


12 











„ 1874 . 


12 











Miss Gardiner, from 






OFFERTORIES. 




''The Net" . 


5 15 











J> >> >5 


11 





Braceborough 


12 4 





Rev. E, Gibson . 


1 





,, Scholarship 


20 





Rev. E. F. Hay . 


5 





Beaulieu 


. 1 





Miss Hammond 


7 





Cattistock . 


3 3 


2 


Rt. Rev. Bishop Hobhouse 10 





Cambridge, per Rev. E 






Mrs. Hopkins (per) 


2 14 


6 


J. Smith . 


1 10 


4 


Miss Ibbotson, for Schools 5 15 





Hove, per R. M. Lowe, Esq. 3 





Rev. H. M. Ingram 


1 1 





'5 }i 5> 


4 12 


6 


Rev. C. E. Kennaway . 


2 2 





Kirk Ella . 


1 





Miss Lambert 


1 





Kirby Misperton . 


1 





Lord Lyt^ielton 


1 





Lincoln .... 


2 7 





Rev. W. Macgregor 


1 1 





Lancing College . 


18 


9 


„ ,, Scholarship 


20 





Shottisham . 


5 6 


3 


Rev. H. G. Meara 


1 10 





Stainton le Vale . 


2 9 


6 


1873 


10 





Stamford 


5 





Miss Perceval 


2 





Wells Theological Col- 






,. ,, for scholar 


1 





lege .... 


8 9 





„ (per) 
P. M. F. . 


7 
5 














£681 


6 


H. W. Prescott, Esq. . 
Miss C. R. Raine 
Miss Sellon . 


5 
5 

too 







Paid to the Bishop — 












Rev. F. Sterry . 


2 





From Wolverhampton, 






The Misses Strong 


20 





per Rev. R. Dunn 


22 16' 





Rev. E. Thring . 


5 





From Hove, per R. M. 






Mrs. Tireman 


1 





Lowe, Esq. 


2 





Mr. T. Whitmore . 


5 










— 


1873 


5 







£24 16 





Rev E Willis 


25 











•«-V\> V a JLJ« T T 1XJ.1»3 • • 







16 



Subscription List for the Year 1875. 





£ 


s. 


d. 




£ 


s. 


d. 


Eev. GT. Ainslie . 


1 


1 





Rev. H. G. Meara 


1 


10 





Alverstoke . 


. 1 








Marian W. D. Scholar 








Anon. . 


5 


5 





ship 


. 20 








Kev. S, Arnott 


1 


1 





Mrs. Mitchell 


16 








Sir G. Baker 


5 








Miss Perceval 


3 








Rev. H. Bailey, D.I). 


5 








St. Peter's, Pimlico 


. 5 


14 


6 


Mrs. Bennett 





2 


6 


Mrs. Poole . 


. 3 








Rev. C. A. Borrer 


1 








Rev. P. Potter . 


. 1 


1 





Bolton . 


4 


10 





H. W. Prescott, Esq. 


5 








Miss A. S. Bourne 


5 








Miss C. R. Raine . 


5 








Rev. D. J. Boutflower 


1 


1 





Rochester Local Fund 


. 84 


19 





Braceborough 


16 








Mrs. Salt 


. 2 








>> 


6 


10 





Major- General G. Sand 








„ Scholarship 


» 20 








ham . 


5 








Burton . 


3 


3 





Miss Sellon 


300 








Rev. F. Calder (repay- 








Miss Smith . 


1 








ment of passage money 


25 








Stamford St. Martin 


5 








Rev. Gr. S. Cuthbert 





10 


6 


Rev. F. Sterry 


2 








Church Leech 


1 








Stoke St. Mary . 


1 


1 





Rev. H. Daman . 


3 








Miss Strong . 


10 








Hon. Miss Dawnay 


5 








Miss Thorn . 





2 


6 


A. G. Dowell, Esq. 


1 


1 





Mrs. Tireman 


1 








Edinburgh . 


5 








Warkston 


2 








Rev. E. Elwes 


12 








Wells Theological Col 








Exeter, St. Sidwell's 


1 


1 





lege Missionary As 








Mrs. Frere . 


1 


10 





sociation . 


36 


7 


6 


A Friend 





2 


6 


Wells Theological Col 








Miss Gardiner, from 








lege Offertory . 


6 


7 


6 


"The Net" . 


10 








Rev. E. WUlis 


25 








Rev. E. S. Gibson. 


1 








Mrs. Woodard 





2 





Mrs. Goodrich 





10 





Rev. T.Woodruff. 


5 








Rev. E. F. Hay . 
Rt.Rev. BishopHobhouse 





5 













10 










£767 


7 


1 


Mrs. Hopkins 


2 
17 


12 
4 


3 
9 











Horsham and Arundel 






■"* 


Miss Hulme . 


5 
















Rev. H. M. Ingram 


1 


1 





Paid to the Bishop- 








Rev. C. E. Kennaway 


2 


2 





Rev. W. Turner . 


2 








Miss Lambert 


1 


1 





Mrs. Watt, California 


2 








Lichfield 


5 








Wells theological Col 








R. M. Lowe, Esq. 


. 1 





c 


lege Missionary As- 








Mrs. Lowe . 


1 








sociation (1874) 


30 


7 





Miss Lowe . 


3 








A Widow's Mite (1874) 


5 








Lower Peover 


6 
1 


6 



7 











Lord Lyttelton 


£39 


7 





Rev. W. Macgregor 


1 

> 20 


1 
















„ Scholarship 









17 



Subsenpiion List from Jan. 1 to Sept, 30, 1876, 





£ 


s. 


d. 




£ 


s. 


d. 


Miss A, S. Bourne 


5 








Eev. E. C. Scobell. 


1 


1 





Eev. D. J. Boutflower 


1 


1 





MissSellon . 


200 








Braceborough 


20 


3 


3 


Miss Smith . 


1 








Right Rev. Bishop Hob 








Miss S. Smith 





10 





house. 


10 








S. M. . 


12 








Rev. H. M. Ingram 




1 





St. John, Oxford . 


5 


5 





Miss Lambert 










Miss L. Thorn 





2 


6 


R. M. Lowe, Esq. 










Two Friends . 


2 








Mrs. R. M. Lowe, 










Rev. W. L. Wigan 





10 





Lord Lyttelton 










Miss M. Wilson . 


1 








Marian W. D. Scholar 








The Misses Yonge. 


2 








ship . 


. 20 






















Mrs. Marty n. 


. 5 










£296 


13 


9 


H. W. Prescott, Esq. 


. 5 














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NOTICES. 

I. 

Subscriptions and Donations may he paid either to 
the Treasurer of the S, P. G.^ 19, Delahay Street^ 
Westminster^ JS.W,, to the account of the Hawaiian 
Special Eund; or to the Bishops Commissary , 
Prancis Lowe, Esq., 2, Tanfield Court ^ Temple^ 
London, 

II. 

Friends having parcels to send out to the Mission, will do 
well to send them to the National Society's Office, Sanctuary, 
Westminster, S.W., in the months of March and September. 
There will generally be a package made up for the vessels that 
sail from Bremen for Honolulu direct every Spring and 
Autumn. A Notice of the value of any parcel to be 
forwarded should be sent to the Bev. Edmund Willis, 
Horsham, Sussex, who will give information respecting the 
despatch of packages. The Custom House Regulations at 
Honolulu make it necessary that an accurate invoice should 
be sent of the contents and value of every package. 



ACCOUNT OF THE 

HAWAIIAN CaCRCH BUILDING FUND. 



MANLEY HOPKINS, Treasurer. 



This separate fund was collected for the purpose of buildmg 
a permanent Church or Cathedral, in Honolulu, and the sums 
first collected were applied to that object, but the progress of 
the building was stopped for want of sufficient funds. Since 
that effort, various sums have been sent to the Treasurer, the 
greater for the express object of the fund, but a portion without 
restriction as to use. On account of pressing and immediate 
needs of the Mission, grants from time to time, as shown in 
the Balance Sheet, have been made by the Hawaiian Church 
Committee out of this fund. 



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Hawaiian Church Building Fund. 

SUBSCRIPTION LIST. 



I 



1872. £ s. d. 
Per Manley ffophins, Esq. — 

Rev. J. Wilder 5 

Rev. Francis Buttenshaw 110 

Alfred Tennyson, Esq. 10 

Mrs. Shellard Jacson ... 10 

Anon, per S. P. G. ... 10 

Mrs. Charles Geldart ... 2 
A. J. B. Beresford Hope, 

Esq., M.P. (annual). 5 5 
The Most Rev. the Lord 
Archbishop of Canter- 
bury ... .. ... 5 5 

The Right Rev. the Lord 

Bishop of London ... 5 5 

Rev. R. West— 

Subscription for 1870 5 

1871 5 

1872 5 5 
Offertory at St. Mary 

Magdalen e, Paddington , 

February, 1872 ... 18 6 
The Right Rev. the Lord 
Bishop of Winchester 

(annual). ... ... 5 

Per Miss Wright, Wrangle — 

Mrs. Wingate 10 

Mr. F. Rose 10 

Rev. J. Penny 10 

Smaller Sums 4 3 

Offertory at Wrangle, Feb. 2 15 9 
Rev. W. H. Shields, 
Abergeldie, Offertory 

and Collection ... 2 

Rev. J. A. Willington 10 

Miss Smith 5 

Rev. Dr. Bailev (annual) 5 

Rev. H. Moore 110 

The Misses CoUis (per 

Miss Wright) ... 10 

A. B. Cobb, Esq. ... 110 

The Misses Wilson ... 5 

Mrs. Simeon ... .. 5 
Edmund Warlow, Esq., 

(per Rev. Mr. Halcombe) 10 

Anon. ditto ... 12 

A. C. Devers, Esq. ... 10 
Lord Forbes 10 10 

B. B 5 

W. Henry Campion, Esq. 3 
Lt.-Col. C. E. Cumber- 
land, R.E 10 



£ s. cL 
Miss C. Simson (per Rev. 

Randolph Payne) ... 3 
— Wilton, Esq. ... 5 

Alfred Tennyson, Esq. 2 

Rev. G. A. Herklotz 

(Offertory at St. Savi- 
our's, South Hamp- 

stead on the Day of 

Intercession ... ... 10 13 7 

Rev. A. B. Skip worth 

(per Miss Wright) ... 2 6 
Rev. R. F. Wright (per 

Do., part of Offertory 

at Wrangle on the Day 

of Intercession) ... 1 
Miss Louisa Soul (per do.) 4 
Rev. B. Beridge (per Miss 

Wright) 10 

Rev. West Waget, do. 2 

Miss Gore (Sund. School 

Class Sub., All Saints' 

Ch., South Hampstead 4 6 
Rev. Mr. Wadmore (Of- 
fertory at All Souls' 

Ch., S. Hampstead, on 

the Day of Intercession) 3 16 16 
Manley and Kate Hopkins 5 

Per Messrs. Barnetts, Hoares dk Co. 



Lady Franklin ... 


... 20 








Miss Stanhope ... 


.. 5 








>j > J • • • 


.. 5 








Miss E. T. Long 


... 10 








Clericus... ' ... 


1 


1 





H. H. Gibbs, Esq. 


... 5 


5 






1873. 

Per Manley HopTcins, Esq.— 
Misses CoUis (per Miss 

Wright) 10 

Miss Wingate do. ... 10 

Miss Atkinson do, ... 050 
The Hon. and Rev. the 

Dean of York do. ... 5 

Miss Harriet Wright do. 1 1 

T. Stilwell, Esq. do. . . 5 
Rev. G. F. Prescott (Of- 
fertory, St. Michael's, 

Paddington 5 18 3 

Anon, a Thank-offering 10 

Mrs. Simeon 5 

Rev. Charlton Lane ... 1 1 

Dr. Nevins 2 2 



Subscription List continued. 



£ s. d. 

Eev. E. K. Burney .. 2 2 

Miss Caroline Simson 
(per Rev. Randolph 

Payne) 3 

B. B 5 

Rev. R. West (OflFertory 
at St. Mary Magda- 
lene, Paddington. on 
the Day of Interces- 
sion) 19 2 6 

Manley & Kate Hopkins 5 

Per Messrs. Burnetts, Hoares ds Co. 

Lady Franklin 20 

H. H. Gibbs, Esq. ... 5 5 

H. Barnett, Esq. ... 2 2 

A. B. Cobb, Esq. . 110 

1874. 

Per Manley Hopkins, Esq. — 

Philip Cazenove, Esq. ... 10 

Rev. H. Bailey .. 5 

Alfred Tennyson, Esq. 2 2 
The Rt. Rev. The Lord 

Bishop of Lichfield ... 10 10 

Per Miss Wright. — 

Rev. West Waget ... 3 

Communion of the Sick 2 

Miss Hett 2 

Miss Peacock 10 

Misses CoUis 10 

Miss Wingate 10 

Rev. — Wingate ... 2 6 
Rev. R. Franklin Wright 

Offertory at Wrangle, 

on All Saints' Day ... 18 9 

Rev. Basil Beridge ... 10 

Mrs. Simeon ... ... 5 

Miss C. Simson (per 

Rev. Randolph Payne) 3 

B. B 5 

Sunday School Class Sub- 
scription, All Souls 

Church, Hampstead 5 

Manley & Kate Hopkins 5 

Per Messrs. Barnetts, Hoares ds Co. 

Lady Franklin 20 

H. H. Gibbs, Esq. ... 5 5 

A. B. Cobb, Esq. ... 110 



1875. 
Per Manley Hopki: 
Alfred Tennyson, Esq. 
M. A. Peacock . 





£ 


s. 


d. 


Mrs. Simeon 


5 








B. B 


5 








Per Miss Wright. 









Miss Wingate 





10 





Misses Collis 


1 








Rev. A. B. Skipworth... 





2 


6 


Sermon preached at St. 








John's, Hampstead, by 








The Lord Bishop of 








Lichfield 


26 


18 


9 


Rev. G. A. Herklotz- 








OfFertory at St. Sa- 








viour's, Hampstead, on 








Day of Intercession ... 


4 


3 





Manley & Kate Hopkins 


5 









Esq.— 
2 2 
1 



Per Messrs. Barnetts, Hoares ds Co. 
Lady Franklin 20 

A. B.Cobb 110 

1876. 

Per Manley Hopkins, Esq.- 

Alfred Tennyson, Esq. 2 2 
Misses Collis (per Miss 

Wright) 10 

Mrs. Wingate (per do.) 5 

Misses Wingate (per do.) 5 
OflFertory at Wrangle 

Parish Church (per do.) 2 5 1 

B. B 5 

Mrs. Simeon ... ... 5 

Manley & Kate Hopkins 5 

Per Messrs. Barnetts, Hoares d; Co. 
A. B. Cobb, Esq. ... 1 1 u 

January to March, 1877. 
Per Manley Hopkins, Esq. — 
Alfred Tennyson, Esq. 2 2 

Misses Collis (per Miss 

Wright) 10 

Mrs. & Misses Wingate 

(per ditto) 10 

In answer to appeal in the ^^Net." — 

Miss Twopenny ... 50 

Miss Harriet Arrowsmith 5 

Mrs. J. Bodenham ... 10 

Miss A. Styar 10 

G. (Staplehurst) ... 10 

A. M. C 3 

Per Messrs. Barnetts, Hoares ds Co. 
A. B. Cobb, Esq. ... 110 



mMilitttl^